Protecting Brands Through Packaging

by Todd McDonald on August 15, 2013

Have you ever made a spontaneous purchase based on clever packaging, but then were extremely disappointed when the product itself didn’t meet your expectations?

Ted Mininni, President of Design Force, Inc. ponders how often this happens in his recent Packaging World article “ Exceed Consumer Expectations through Packaging Design” and accurately points out that packaging designed only for the initial sale vs. the transparent delivery of the brand and its value can only serve to damage a brand’s equity – especially in today’s age of social media sites like Yelp! Google Reviews and Epinions.

In other words, if you feel you have been duped or cheated by the promises of a slick package, chances are not only will you never purchase the product again, but you just may be angry enough to voice your opinion to anyone that will listen.

The solution may seem obvious, but as Mininni puts it, “Consumers are delighted when their expectations are rewarded—and exceeded—when purchasing a branded product.”

He then goes on to explore some innovative ways some companies have optimized packaging “to bring the brand to consumers’ attention, sell them, and deliver more than expected, earning their affirmation” – from Theo Chocolate’s refreshed packaging that uses a white background and unique font to represent a line of dripping chocolate while also highlighting important messaging and seals – to Dr. Scholl’s innovative PET packaging for its new Active Series of replacement insoles for athletes that uses specific die-cut windows over each of the three insole zones that allow the consumer to feel the cushioning or rigidity of each – to Green Toys simplistic packaging that uses a minimalistic approach and envelopes toys made from recycled milk jugs in 100% recyclable in corrugated box material and printed on with soy inks.

At TEQ, we thrive on being part of innovative solutions like these and working hand-in-hand with brand teams from the start, whether that means consulting with our in-house design and engineering teams, taking advantage of our extensive network of expert partners, or utilizing our unique in-house equipment such as rapid prototyping technology to create real life representations of products that can guarantee the form, fit and function of the design.

What about you? What are some ways you have seen or developed packaging design that helps brands exceed customer expectations?

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